hello my name is femme shark

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dharmaraye:


mineralizedmind:

assorted fire opal from Mexico

beautiful

"If we think about sexism and misogyny as air pollution, we’re all breathing it in, right. Regardless of how much we’re contributing to that air pollution, we all have a responsibility to fix it."

- Anita Sarkeesian - Blurred Lines: The New Battle of the Sexes (via emiello)

(via lobo-fantasmas)

roadkillandcrows:

Smoky quartz, amethyst and rose quartz.

Reblog if ur gay and Capitalism needs to go

(Source: ghostqunk, via afrometaphysics)

lemaddyart:

lavender study, from a nice day in the park

tat dreams!

"The thing about patriarchy is that individual men, gay and straight, are often really wonderful people who you love deeply, but they have internalized some really poisonous shit. So every once in a while they say or do something that really shakes you because you’re no longer totally certain they see you as a human being, and you feel totally disempowered to explain that to them."

- (via cunicular)

(Source: lasluchasdelcorazon, via learn2anarchy)

"i am not from here. my hair smells of the wind and is full of constellations, and i move about this world with a healthy disbelief."

- (via pepperalley)

(Source: sisterhimalaya, via xulaxicana)

plantaplanta:

be protective of your space and energy

(via rabbitglitter)

1000drawings:

sad ghost club  by Lize meddings

(via combatbooty)

"Israel, the Israelis, and the rest of the world have been brainwashed. They don’t think of pre-1948, they have no idea Palestinians were in Israel, who we were before ’48. As if we were born in 1948 according to them. They have no notion that we had a country, houses, rebelled against the Ottomans and the British. They think history in that region started in that moment. The influence that brings this kind of scene in carries the burden of all these questions and preconceptions that a lot of people have or don’t know about the history of the region. About the looting in particular…I was shooting for a location in my neighborhood, and told a neighbor I wanted to shoot a scene from her balcony. She told me, “Come, I’ll show you something.” She showed me bullet holes in walls of her house. She explained that in 1948, she had just returned from her honeymoon in Beirut where she bought embroideries and other souvenirs. One day she walked into her house and found the Haganah wrapping all the embroideries and gold. They were looting her house. When her husband tried to prevent one of them (from the looting), they scared him by shooting. While telling me the story, she started to tear up. Sixty years later and it was as if it had just happened to her. I was so moved, disturbed, and angry, I told her I was going to take some revenge for her by creating this looting scene. I shot it outside of her house. I wanted an Israeli tank in the film and my line producer who is a good friend, Avi Kleinberger, asked the Israeli Army knowing they were not going to give it to him. Indeed they refused, but it wasn’t because of the tank or that scene. They didn’t care about the script, or 1948. They objected to the looting scene in script, because they said, “We are a moral army, we never steal.” [Laughs.] I told Avi, “They stole a fuckin’ country and didn’t feel moral about it.”"

-

Elia Suleiman on the looting scene from his movie, The Time That Remains (via estaslem)

Although I understand where the author is coming from, and what they’re trying to get across, the idea of Israeli’s being brainwashed should be challenged. It depicts Israeli’s as helpless, mere products of their country, and overlooks their active role in the genocide of the Palestinian people. They enable and carry out the violence and are willfully implicit in it. 

(via lehaaz)

(via the-uncensored-she)

(Source: meorzo, via feisty-feminist)

yoursecretary:

page 14 from the worst: A Compilation Zine on Grief and Loss.  Talks about radical response to death and loss, + how to support someone who is grieving. (click image to go to printable pdf)
[image description: a cut n paste zine page from the worst #1: A Compilation Zine on Grief and Loss. Text reads:
“Circle what you think you might need:
for me to come and hold you
for me to stay outside your door but play you some music
for me to play music for you inside your room
for me to ask you questions
for me to just be near and be silent
for me to hold your hand while you call your other family
to talk about the rest of the family
to go outside and scream
to talk about anything but this death
to get away from here
go to a movie
distraction
acknowledgment
some kind of ceremony
to get the rest of the roommates out of the house
to get the rest of the roommates to stop giving you uncomfortable looks
to get people to stop trying to cheer you up
to tell everyone else that this is the anniversary day
to tell you that all the mixed things you feel are okay
to tell you the things i love about you
to tell you that this is the worst thing you’ll ever know
to tell you that i want to know everything. it is not a burden.
circle what you think you might need. or write more. i want to be here for you. i want to be your friend”.]


still one of the single most helpful things i found when i lost my mom.